Weizhen Tang at Trial - in-chf. (2) 唐炜臻在被告席上回答问题和指控

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You were sent by the Chinese Government to study in the U.S. at the University of Ohio?

A. Yes.

Q. In the Department of Biology as a visiting


5 scholar?

10


A. Yes.

Q. And was that for one year, I gathered?

A. Yes, it 1 s a one year schedule.

Q. And so in 1988 you go back to China; right?

A. Yes.

Q. And it notes here that you made your first


business endeavour at the Central South China Institute of Forrestry in a revenue generation event selling postcards and making a sensation on campus?

15 A. Yes.

Q. Do you point that out in your book too about making a sensation on campus?

A. Yes, I did that one because, you know, at the time when we as a teacher people are very academic so not

20 very much business, but my family actually is a business origin. My father is a carpenter, he also do business.

Q. Can you just go to page 25 and then put that


on the elmo?


A. Sure.

Q. To show the Jury that you actually had a


chapter entitled that you were a sensation in Toronto?

A. Okay. The first sensation was in campus in China, because I have a very famous furniture designer. He is an artist and, you know, designing professor. So he designcc;d

5 postcard, hand-made, he is an artist, then he used the photos,

flowers, roses, it’s not practical, so I changed it. After I went to U.S. I bought a camera, a Nikon, you know; that’s the best camera at that time, only about four hundred dollars, nobody had that camera. So when I go back to China I take a

10 lot of pictures of the campus. I replaced the flower, I used

the campus flowers and it appeared to the fresh man, you know student, so they can send it back to China, to home, they are very heavy. Everybody want to buy. I also used - because’in America they have pricing structure, it’s different price, you

15 know, when cheap people want to buy, when the price are high people, you know, less people want to buy. I just want to change the price, it’s very funny, and people never know that before. Very interesting, everybody buy my postcard.

20 At that time, because of the designer who is not businessman, he print lots of photos, nobody want to buy, so that’s wasting money, so when I replace with campus forest scenery, people love it. I print at forty cents, I sell for eighty cents. You know, at that time one day’s income I can make hundreds of dollars, but as a teacher in the university I


Monday 1 October 15 1 2012

make hundred dollars a month.

Q. You note that at page 26.

A. Yes 1 26 is Toronto Sensational because in Toronto Investment.

5 Q. You say at page 26 the second clear paragraph there: “In an era when the monthly salary of university teacher in China is only less than one hundred RNB. 11

A. Yes.

Q. What’s RNB?

10 A. RNB is Chinese currency, but to them like fifteen dollars a month at that time.

Q. We were making one to two hundred each day?

A. Yes.

Q. So this was sort of like the first sign of

15 your business prowess?

A. Exactly.

That’s the point you are trying to make?

A. Yeah.

Q. Okay.

20 A. My family is business oriented.

Q. You say your family is business oriented, but I thought you had indicated that you are the son of a carpenter and the grandson of a carpenter?

A. Yes. My mom family buy and sell.

Q. Your mom family are traders?


A. Yes.

Q. Okay. So again, in 1988 at the tender age of thirty you are accepted by University of Waterloo here in Ontario, in Canada, as a post-graduate student to do biological

5 studies?

A. Yes.

Q. What brought that on? This is your first foray into this country, right? What brought that on?

A. Yes, the first time when I come to

10 University of Waterloo to Canada I also had to borrow lots of money because the university only give me a scholarship of thirteen thousand, but the minimum requirement is sixteen thousand for a year. It’s a huge number. So I borrow all the money and I got four thousand dollars; four thousand dollars is

15 an astronomical number for us. I borrowed four thousand dollars. That’s more than ten, twenty years salary, you know. Nobody have that kind of saving.

Q. Okay. You are coming to Canada from Communist China in 1988?

20 A. Yes.

Q. Did you need the consent of the Chinese Government to come and pursue your post-graduate studies?

A. Yes.

Q. How difficult is that?

A. Extremely difficult. At that time, because


we are the first as the private graduate students, because at that time nobody know outsider, like North American people don’t know Chinese, you know. It’s extremely difficult.

Q. So you are saying there is some type of

5 cultural devise?

A. Yes, yes.

Q. And there is a misunderstanding?

A. Yes, big misunderstanding. People afraid of you. For instance, they are capitalist, and capitalist people

10 are thinking that you are being influenced by the communist.

Q. So there is a mistrust between the two


systems?

15


Exactly.

Q.

Are you a Canadian citizen?

A. Yes.

Q.

When did you get your Canadian citizenship?

A. I get my Canadian citizenship, I don’t


remember exactly, but fifteen years probably.

Q. All right. Continuing on to 1990, you begin

Yes.

20 your post-graduate study at the University of Waterloo, eventually getting a full scholarship?

A.

Q. Is this like a Master’s Degree?

A. Yes, Master of Science.

Q. Which you eventually acquired, right?


W. Tang in-chf. (Boushy) Monday, October 15, 2012

A. Yes.

Q. You have a Masters Degree?

A. I have a Masters Degree, yes.

Q. Continue, sir?

5 A. I have a Masters Degree in Biology and I got a full scholarship after I landed into the university.

Actually my supervisor likes me very much so he get all the money for me, so I return all the money borrowed from my relatives with the interest of thirty percent.

10 Q. How many years did you stay at Waterloo?

A. Two years.

Q. It took you two years to get the M.A. then?

A. Yes. I also get two paper published in two


year study.

15


Q. Did you know where you got it published?

A. Yes, here.

A.

Do you know the name of the publication? I don 1 t remember.

Q. Okay. So you are studying here, you are by


20 yourself, I gather, your wife is still back home in China?

A. I came here first by myself. One year later


she was here.


You became a permanent resident in 1991? Yes.

Q. And that 1 s when your wife and your daughter


joined you; right?

A. Yes.

Q. In 1991 you are hired as a consultant, you say here, for a major environmental protection firm in Canada

5 while continuing your studies?

A. Yes. I make double the money the average


people do.

10


Q. So you finally graduated in 1992?

A. Yes.

Q. And you started working soon thereafter at


Toronto Sick Kids?

A. Yes.

Q. I just want to know you, this is a picture of you and your family?

15 A. Yes.

Q. So this is your only daughter, right, between you and your wife?

A. Yes. She is a trader too.

Q. Okay. And whereabouts is your son?

20 A. I have a son.

Q. And your son was born in Canada? A. Yes, 1994.

Q. You mentioned your mother and your father?

A. My father and my mother, since I work at a university in China, they always live with me for more than


twenty years until they passed away.

Q. And both your folks passed away now?

A. Yes.

Q. You ended up bringing your parents over to

5      Canada?


10


A. Yes. They are featured there too. MR. BOUSHY: If we can make these photos exhibits, Your Honour?

THE COURT: 85 A and B.

THE REGISTRAR: Exhibit 85 A and B.


EXHIBIT NO. SSA: EXHIBIT NO. BSB:


Photo of W. Tang with Family and Parents Photo of W. Tang and Family


15 BY MR. BOUSHY:

Q. You were able to get a job pretty quickly at Toronto Sick Kids?

A. Yes. Actually my first job was at Toronto General Hospital. I was doing research there for six months.

20 I found my skill is…everybody likes it so I quickly moved to another job at Sick Kids.

Q. Okay. When you were working at Toronto Sick Kids in Bio-Medicine, were you a researcher? what were you dong there?

A. I am a research assistant.

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